Meanderings

"There is no other life that can be this one again." -W.S. Merwin
vintageanchorbooks:

“What a terrible thing could be freedom. Trees were free when they were uprooted by the wind; ships were free when they were torn from their moorings; men were free when they were cast out of their homes—free to starve, free to perish of cold and hunger.” ― Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness Marguerite Radclyffe Hall was born in Bournemouth, England, on this day in 1880.  Her most famous novel THE WELL OF LONELINESS, first published in 1928, is timeless portrayal of lesbian love. The thinly disguised story of Hall’s own life, it was banned outright upon publication and almost ruined her literary career.

vintageanchorbooks:

“What a terrible thing could be freedom. Trees were free when they were uprooted by the wind; ships were free when they were torn from their moorings; men were free when they were cast out of their homes—free to starve, free to perish of cold and hunger.”
― Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness

Marguerite Radclyffe Hall was born in Bournemouth, England, on this day in 1880.  Her most famous novel THE WELL OF LONELINESS, first published in 1928, is timeless portrayal of lesbian love. The thinly disguised story of Hall’s own life, it was banned outright upon publication and almost ruined her literary career.

Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand — and melting like a snowflake.

—Sir Francis Bacon (via quotestuff)

(via journalofanobody)

gettyimagesarchive:

On this day in 1974 - Pres. Nixon embracing daughter Julie after he told his family that he would resign Presidency the next day, at White House.
Photo by Ollie Atkins/White House/The LIFE Picture Collection

gettyimagesarchive:

On this day in 1974 - Pres. Nixon embracing daughter Julie after he told his family that he would resign Presidency the next day, at White House.

Photo by Ollie Atkins/White House/The LIFE Picture Collection

rorschachx:

A long exposure image shows the El Portal Fire burning near Yosemite national park, California | image by Stuart Palley

rorschachx:

A long exposure image shows the El Portal Fire burning near Yosemite national park, California | image by Stuart Palley

npr:

Friends, we need your help. NPR’s Melissa Block recently interviewed musician Passenger (Mike Rosenberg) and he shared a story about a chance encounter with a stranger who had a profound impact on his life. We want to find that stranger.

Here’s the deal: Last year during a tour stop in Minneapolis, Rosenberg made a late-night gas station trip to buy cigarettes. He struck up a conversation with an older man who was smoking outside next to his motorcycle. He learned that this gentlemen had been diagnosed with lung cancer and was midway through a cross-country road trip to see his family in New York, where he planned to spend the rest of his days. 

Rosenberg never got the man’s name, but the experience affected him deeply. He quit smoking and wrote the song “Riding to New York.”  

We’d love to reach this man or his family. If you think you might know who he is, please email nprcrowdsource@npr.org

Please reshare this. I know we can track this guy down. (We did it once before.)